Published: 31 March 2014

During the last month, ALICE has published a wealth of scientific results deepening our understanding of the Quark Gluon Plasma and strong interactions and showing how exciting is the field of heavy-ion physics at the LHC. Recently four of them successfully submitted their thesis following their research with ALICE.

Bernard Hicks presented his thesis on the “Differential Production Cross-section of Heavy-Flavor Electrons sqrt(s) = 2.76 TeV pp collisions at the LHC with the ALICE detector" under the supervision of Helen Caines (Yale University). His work advances our understanding of heavy-flavour production in pp collisions at highest energies at the LHC. Dr. Hicks has also worked in the Caibration of the EMCAL detectors, an important part of the ALICE experiment.

Nicolas Arbor submitted his PhD in LPSC, Grenoble under the supervision of Christophe Furget. His thesis “A study of parton fragmentation using photon-hadron correlation with the ALICE experiment at LHC (https://cds.cern.ch/record/1647344?ln=en) explores how parton fragmentation is modified in nuclear collisions at highest energies, by using photon-hadron correlations. Dr. Arbor has also worked on the EMCAL, both on beam tests and on the L1 trigger implementation.

Sudipan De, a PhD student from VECC, Kolkata India studied the "Photon Production and Forward-Backward Multiplicity Correlation in ALICE at the LHC" in the Homi Bhabha National Institute (HBNI). Under the supervision of Tapan Nayak, Sudipan examined how parton fragmentation is modified in nuclear collisions at highest energies, by using photon-hadron correlations. Sudipan has also carried out important work on the Quality Assurance of PMD data thus helping the amount of data from the collaboration.

Finally, Eulogio Serradilla Rodriguez defended his thesis earlier this month in the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. His supervisors were Arturo Alejandro Menchaca Rocha (Istituto de Fisica, UNAM, Mexico) and Pedro Jorge Ladron de Guevara Montero (CIEMAT, Spain). Dr. Rodriguez worked on understanding of the production of nuclei in proton-proton collisions with ALICE and specifically on: the “Producción de núcleos de deuterio y antideuterio en el experimento ALICE”.