by Iva Raynova. Published: 10 November 2015

On the 1st of June Valentina Zaccolo from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, presented her PhD thesis on “Charged particle multiplicity distributions over wide pseudorapidity range in proton-proton and proton-lead collisions with ALICE”, completed under the supervision of Prof. Jens Jørgen Gaardhøje. Her work has contributed to the study of multiparticle production in both proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, exploiting the unique capability of ALICE to measure charged particles in a very wide rapidity range. Valentina has also worked on the Quality Assurance of the ALICE FMD data, thus helping the overall success of the experiment.

In July Simone Schuchmann from Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main, completed her PhD thesis on "Modification of K0s and Lambda(aLambda) transverse momentum spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV with ALICE", which has contributed to the study of strangeness production in nuclear collisions. Simone also helped in furthering the overall success of the experiment by working on the studies of the TPC momentum resolution. Her thesis was supervised by Prof. Harald Appelshaeuser.

"Azimuthal Anisotropy of Strange and Charm Hadrons" was the topic of Carlos Eugenio Perez Lara’s PhD thesis from the Utrecht University, The Netherlands, which he defended in August, done under the supervision of Prof. Thomas Peitzmann. His work contributed to the understanding of the interaction of strange and charmed quarks with the hot and dense medium in nuclear collisions.

In September Hans Beck from Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main contributed to the understanding of femtoscopic measurements in nuclear collisions with his PhD thesis on "Femtoscopic p-Lambda and gamma-gamma Correlations in Pb-Pb Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV with ALICE", supervised by Prof. Christoph Blume. Hans also worked on the Online QA and electronics monitoring for the ALICE-TRD.

Hugo Daniel Hernandez Herrera from the Electronic Systems Engineering Department, Polytechnical School of Engineering of the University of Sao Paulo, defended his PhD thesis on "Noise and PSRR Improvement Technique for TPC Readout Front-end in CMOS Technology", done under the supervision of Prof. Wilhelmus Van Noije and thus contributed to the development of innovative electronics for the readout of the future ALICE TPC.

Finally, by completing his PhD thesis on "Multiplicity dependence of two-particle correlations in sqrt(s) = 7TeV pp collisions at the LHC-ALICE experiment”, supervised by Prof. ShinIchi Esumi, Jihyun Bhom from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, contributed to the understanding of possible collective phenomena in pp collisions.