by Iva Raynova. Published: 31 August 2016

On 25 July 2016 Tyler Browning form the Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA, successfully defended his theses work on "Direct Photon Anisotropy and the Time evolution of the Quark-Gluon Plasma". It was supervised by Professor Brijesh K. Srivastava and Rolf Scharenberg. Tyler’s thesis work has contributed to the understanding of the time evolution of high-density strongly interacting systems. He also contributed to the construction of the ALICE EMCAL.

“Multihadron production in high-energy collisions and forward rapidity measurement of inclusive photons in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in the ALICE experiment at the LHC” was the title of Aditya Nath Mishra’s PhD work. It was supervised by Dr Raghunath Sahoo. After a successful defence, his PhD was granted by the Indian Institute of Technology, Indore, India, on 1 July 2016. Aditya contributed to the understanding of multiparticle production in high-density strongly interacting systems and also to the testing, installation, data taking, data QA and calibration of the Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD).

On 9 June 2016 Tuva Ora Herenui Richert, presented her work on "Λ/K0s associated with a jet in central Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV measured with the ALICE detector", done under the supervision of Dr Peter Christiansen, Professor Anders Oskarsson (deputy) and Professor Evert Stenlund (deputy). Her PhD was granted by the Lund University, Sweden. Her thesis work has contributed to the understanding of the relation between hard physics and soft physics in the challenging intermediate pT regime. She also worked on the front-end electronics for the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and on the installation of the RCU2 TPC cards.

In April 2016 two ALICE PhDs were granted by the Heidelberg University, Germany. Under the supervision of Prof Johanna Stachel, Michael Winn completed his work on "Inclusive J/psi production at mid-rapidity in p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV". Michael contributed to the understanding of charmonium production in high-density strongly interacting systems. He was also responsible for more than two years for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) gas system.

Felix Reidt defended his work on "Studies for the ALICE Inner Tracking System Upgrade", done under the supervision of Prof Johanna Stachel and the co-supervision of Dr Luciano Musa. He contributed to the design of the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System, a key tool for the future of ALICE and he also worked on the development of a readout system for the test of sensor prototypes.

On 24 November 2015 Jacobus Willem van Hoorne from The Vienna University of Technology successfully defended his thesis, titled "Study and Development of a novel Silicon Pixel Detector for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System”. It was done under the supervision of Dr Manfred Krammer and Dr Petra Riedler. His thesis work has contributed to the development of innovative detectors for the upgrade of ALICE.