by Virginia Greco. Published: 05 November 2016

On Friday 30 September CERN ran its 7th edition of the European Researchers' Night, event dedicated to popular science in which external public can visit the facility and meet scientists. ALICE took part in the event with a series of direct live connections with various European  research institutes and participating to the CERN webcast.

A moment of the webcast

On Friday 30 September CERN ran its 7th edition of the European Researchers' Night, event dedicated to popular science in which external public can visit the facility and meet scientists. Besides guided tours of the ATLAS Visitor Centre, screening of documentaries in the Globe and exceptional late opening of the Universe of Particles exhibition, this edition foresaw a webcast -from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.- with connections in sequence from the CERN Control Centre, LHCb, the CERN Data Centre, ALICE, and CMS.

ALICE took part in the event with a series of direct live connections with various European institutes, organising European Researchers' Night events. Students, professors and the general public could interact with scientists sitting in the control room, visit it remotely and ask questions. Giacinto De Cataldo and Mikolaj Krzewicki discussed about the ALICE experiment and particle physics with people connected from the National Laboratories of Frascati (Italy) and the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Krakow (Poland). Then, Despina Hatzifotiadou interacted with the public at Researchers’ Night  at the National Technical University of Athens (Greece).

 

At 9p.m. it was ALICE’s turn in the CERN webcast: Giacinto and Despina gave an introduction about the experiment, showed the various workstations in the control room and introduced to the public the experts on shift, who had the possibility to intervene themselves. Students from the University of Malta, the Practical Robotics Institute of Austria, and the Stefan Meyer Institute of Subatomic Physics of Austria, who were connected remotely, participated with comments and questions to the scientists. The public following the webcast could also communicate with the experts through social media. Regular updates on the event were given to our followers through Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

The event was successful, students showed great interest and our experts spent an unusual, cheerful evening in the ALICE control room.