by Virginia Greco. Published: 09 January 2017

Junior researchers of ALICE launch a series of lectures for further education of students and members of the collaboration.

At the first meeting of the ALICE Journal Club, held on November 29, Redmer Bertens, of the University of Utrecht, discussed about jet energy loss in the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

At the first meeting of the ALICE Journal Club, held on November 29, Redmer Bertens, of the University of Utrecht, discussed about jet energy loss in the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

 

A common need of young physicists (Ph.D. students or postdocs) who are pursuing their research in an experiment like ALICE is being fully trained on the topic they are addressing and placing it into the broader context of particle and nuclear physics. This is not always easy to achieve, due to lack of time, because of the high specialization of some research activities that can be carried out -up to some point- regardless of the bigger picture, or because it may be difficulty for supervisors to know the specific needs of each student.

The group of junior researchers of ALICE, who already run a forum to exchange messages and discuss physics topics, has launched a new initiative to promote internal training: the ALICE Journal Club. The idea is to pick a topic they want to understand more in depth and invite an expert in the field to give a lecture on it. The lecturer is expected to cover not only the last advances in the field, but -more importantly- the basics, and possibly to discuss with the audience the most difficult points.

At the first meeting of the ALICE Journal Club, held on November 29, Redmer Bertens, of the University of Tennessee, discussed about jet energy loss in the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The event had a good reception, with about 50 attendees between people present in the room and remotely connected. The audience was mainly composed of young researchers, due to the intrinsic pedagogical form of the meeting, but the organizers – Jacopo Margutti and Mike Henry Petrus Sas – hope to be able to attract more members of the collaboration to future events.

The plan is to have at least a lecture every two months. Depending on the participation and the requests, more meetings can be organized. Proposals for the topics will be discussed in the forum of the junior researchers, nevertheless any member of the collaboration can suggest a theme and a speaker.

The next appointment is for January 16 (from 2 to 4 pm CET), when Jean-François Paquet, of the Stony Brook University (US), will talk about the "direct photon puzzle”, i.e. the difficulty to describe simultaneously with theoretical models both the measured yield and the elliptic flow.